Customs Database

CustomsCustoms duties are a form of tax payable to the State mainly when importing goods into a customs territory. From a protectionist perspective, protective duties play an important role as they are designed to afford domestic producers some protection against foreign competition. In most countries, customs duties are levied as an ad valorem duty, which means the level of duty payable is calculated as a percentage of the value of a given product. By contrast, Switzerland applies the “specific tariff” system for most goods. The specific tariff here is payable per 100 kg net weight. Given the numerous customs duty reductions under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT; now the World Trade Organization), customs are now much less important in terms of international trade. In Switzerland, the Swiss Federal Customs Administration (FCA) is responsible for levying customs duties. Internationally, customs administration authorities are members of the broader World Customs Organization (WCOOMD). Database (worldwide customs tariffs)

Our Customs Database is a foreign trade portal for country-specific information on tariff and non-tariff trade measures. Switzerland Global Enterprise provides companies in Switzerland and Liechtenstein free access to the modular database.

• The Nomenclature module enables queries to be made using a range of nomenclatures.

• The Customs Tariffs module provides detailed information on import duties in more than 150 countries.

• The Import Formalities module contains a detailed overview of the customs procedures for imported goods in over 100 countries.

• The Rules of Origin module contains list rules of the origin protocols of all Swiss/EFTA Free Trade AgreementsAgreements are becoming increasingly important within the context of international commerce. Given the different written laws and forms of legal practice that exist across the world and the different interpretations of the law that are culturally conditioned, it is impossible to devote too much attention to devising “good” agreements. Model agreements have proven to be useful, particularly for companies with little experience in this area. on product basis.

Register here for free access to the Customs Database.

If you experience problems with your registration, please send an e-mail to s-ge@mendel-online.eu and the support will take care of your enquiry.

Switzerland Global Enterprise accepts no liability for the accuracy of the content contained therein. Please refer to the Terms and Conditions of Use from Mendel Verlag GmbH & Co. KG for MendelOnline.

TARICTARIC is an acronym for what is known as the Integrated Tariff of the European Communities (Tarif Intégré des Communautés Européennes). It is based on the Combined Nomenclature (CN), which covers some 10,000 headings (using an 8-digit code) and constitutes the basic nomenclature used for the Common Customs Tariff, the Community’s foreign trade statistics, and trade between Member States. TARIC also serves as the basis for the working and customs tariffs and the Member States’ tariff files.

TARIC provides details of:
1. Tariff suspensions
2. Tariff quotas
3. Tariff preferences (including tariff quotas and ceilings)
4. General preference system regarding developing countries
5. Anti-dumping and countervailing duties
6. Countervailing charges
7. Agricultural components
8. Average values
9. Standard import values
10. Reference and minimum prices
11. Import prohibitions
12. Import restrictions
13. Import surveillance
14. Export prohibitions
15. Export restrictions
16. Export surveillance
17. Export refunds
(European Union)

Another excellent source of customs information relating to EU countries is the EU customs database TARIC. This provides more precise information about the customs tariffs in the individual EU member states.

TARIC is based on combined nomenclature (CN) in which some 10,000 items (coded using 8 digits) form the basic nomenclature. This applies not just to the collective customs tariff, but also to European Union foreign trade statistics and trade between its member states. TARIC is also the basis for the consumption customs tariffs and tariff files of the EU member states.

TaresSwitzerland’s working tariff has been available on the Internet at www.tares.ch since 3rd May 2004. Apart from providing details on the Swiss working tariff, tares also offers explanations of the customs tariff, as well as rulings concerning the tariff charged on goods. In addition, the service offers a number of search functions and links to circulars, tariff quotas and exchange rates. More information to be found here: http://www.exportblog.ch/de/blog/«tares»-–-der-schweizerische-zolltarif (German). (Switzerland)

The Swiss Customs Authority provides the customs tariff (Tares) on the internet free of charge. In addition to the Swiss consumption tariff, Tares also contains explanatory information about the customs tariff as well as rulings on goods tariffs. The service is supplemented by various search functions and numerous links to circulars, customs quotas and exchange rates.

Like most customs tariffs around the world, the Swiss customs tariff is based upon the internationally valid harmonised system (HS). The first six digits of the eight-digit Swiss tariff numbers correspond to the HS.

CustomsCustoms duties are a form of tax payable to the State mainly when importing goods into a customs territory. From a protectionist perspective, protective duties play an important role as they are designed to afford domestic producers some protection against foreign competition. In most countries, customs duties are levied as an ad valorem duty, which means the level of duty payable is calculated as a percentage of the value of a given product. By contrast, Switzerland applies the “specific tariff” system for most goods. The specific tariff here is payable per 100 kg net weight. Given the numerous customs duty reductions under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT; now the World Trade Organization), customs are now much less important in terms of international trade. In Switzerland, the Swiss Federal Customs Administration (FCA) is responsible for levying customs duties. Internationally, customs administration authorities are members of the broader World Customs Organization (WCOOMD). Database (worldwide customs tariffs)

Our Customs Database is a foreign trade portal for country-specific information on tariff and non-tariff trade measures. Switzerland Global Enterprise provides companies in Switzerland and Liechtenstein free access to the modular database.

• The Nomenclature module enables queries to be made using a range of nomenclatures.

• The Customs Tariffs module provides detailed information on import duties in more than 150 countries.

• The Import Formalities module contains a detailed overview of the customs procedures for imported goods in over 100 countries.

• The Rules of Origin module contains list rules of the origin protocols of all Swiss/EFTA Free Trade AgreementsAgreements are becoming increasingly important within the context of international commerce. Given the different written laws and forms of legal practice that exist across the world and the different interpretations of the law that are culturally conditioned, it is impossible to devote too much attention to devising “good” agreements. Model agreements have proven to be useful, particularly for companies with little experience in this area. on product basis.

Register here for free access to the Customs Database.

If you experience problems with your registration, please send an e-mail to s-ge@mendel-online.eu and the support will take care of your enquiry.

Switzerland Global Enterprise accepts no liability for the accuracy of the content contained therein. Please refer to the Terms and Conditions of Use from Mendel Verlag GmbH & Co. KG for MendelOnline.

TARICTARIC is an acronym for what is known as the Integrated Tariff of the European Communities (Tarif Intégré des Communautés Européennes). It is based on the Combined Nomenclature (CN), which covers some 10,000 headings (using an 8-digit code) and constitutes the basic nomenclature used for the Common Customs Tariff, the Community’s foreign trade statistics, and trade between Member States. TARIC also serves as the basis for the working and customs tariffs and the Member States’ tariff files.

TARIC provides details of:
1. Tariff suspensions
2. Tariff quotas
3. Tariff preferences (including tariff quotas and ceilings)
4. General preference system regarding developing countries
5. Anti-dumping and countervailing duties
6. Countervailing charges
7. Agricultural components
8. Average values
9. Standard import values
10. Reference and minimum prices
11. Import prohibitions
12. Import restrictions
13. Import surveillance
14. Export prohibitions
15. Export restrictions
16. Export surveillance
17. Export refunds
(European Union)

Another excellent source of customs information relating to EU countries is the EU customs database TARIC. This provides more precise information about the customs tariffs in the individual EU member states.

TARIC is based on combined nomenclature (CN) in which some 10,000 items (coded using 8 digits) form the basic nomenclature. This applies not just to the collective customs tariff, but also to European Union foreign trade statistics and trade between its member states. TARIC is also the basis for the consumption customs tariffs and tariff files of the EU member states.

TaresSwitzerland’s working tariff has been available on the Internet at www.tares.ch since 3rd May 2004. Apart from providing details on the Swiss working tariff, tares also offers explanations of the customs tariff, as well as rulings concerning the tariff charged on goods. In addition, the service offers a number of search functions and links to circulars, tariff quotas and exchange rates. More information to be found here: http://www.exportblog.ch/de/blog/«tares»-–-der-schweizerische-zolltarif (German). (Switzerland)

The Swiss Customs Authority provides the customs tariff (Tares) on the internet free of charge. In addition to the Swiss consumption tariff, Tares also contains explanatory information about the customs tariff as well as rulings on goods tariffs. The service is supplemented by various search functions and numerous links to circulars, customs quotas and exchange rates.

Like most customs tariffs around the world, the Swiss customs tariff is based upon the internationally valid harmonised system (HS). The first six digits of the eight-digit Swiss tariff numbers correspond to the HS.

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