Swiss Innovation

Swiss Innovation
Research laboratory at EMPA

As a result of their innovative strength, Swiss companies have been competing successfully against international rivals in a range of industries for decades. Global corporations and small to medium-sized businesses alike make ongoing investments in research and development (R&D) in order to continuously improve their processes, services, and products. 

Swiss companies are also skilled at turning research results into market-ready products. Switzerland offers the ideal legal and fiscal conditions for the centralized management and utilization of intellectual property (IP) rights through a single collecting body. In many cases, this results in a lower tax rate for license holders within holding, principal, domiciliary, or joint companies. Possessing a large number of competent, multilingual IP specialists, in addition to being a member of all major international IP organizations, further highlights how ideal Switzerland is as an environment for the protection, use and commercialization of intellectual property – within Switzerland and beyond.

Switzerland’s capacity for innovation is secured over the long term by the presence of renowned globally connected universities, such as ETH Zürich and EPF Lausanne, as well as four research institutes and seven cantonal universities. They conduct excellent basic public research. In technical and scientific specialist areas, Swiss publications are cited, on average, more frequently than other global publications are. These factors have enabled Swiss companies to retain their competitive edge despite the strength of the Swiss franc in recent years. 

In a Europe-wide comparison, the EU’s Innovation Union Scoreboard 2014 identified Switzerland as a first-class location for innovation. Switzerland was rated first in terms of innovative strength, followed by Sweden, Denmark, and Germany. The rating is based on the number of PhD students and scientific publications per capita. In addition, on the innovation scale, which consists of 25 factors, Switzerland scored higher than 0.8 – well above the EU average of around 0.68.

To further strengthen Switzerland’s innovation capacity, the government is planning on establishing Switzerland Innovation, an innovation park with various hubs and network locations for the promotion of research and innovation. The first centers are due to open in early 2016.

Download the Innovation fact sheet

Global,

As a result of their innovative strength, Swiss companies have been competing successfully against international rivals in a range of industries for decades. Global corporations and small to medium-sized businesses alike make ongoing investments in research and development (R&D) in order to continuously improve their processes, services, and products. 

Swiss companies are also skilled at turning research results into market-ready products. Switzerland offers the ideal legal and fiscal conditions for the centralized management and utilization of intellectual property (IP) rights through a single collecting body. In many cases, this results in a lower tax rate for license holders within holding, principal, domiciliary, or joint companies. Possessing a large number of competent, multilingual IP specialists, in addition to being a member of all major international IP organizations, further highlights how ideal Switzerland is as an environment for the protection, use and commercialization of intellectual property – within Switzerland and beyond.

Switzerland’s capacity for innovation is secured over the long term by the presence of renowned globally connected universities, such as ETH Zürich and EPF Lausanne, as well as four research institutes and seven cantonal universities. They conduct excellent basic public research. In technical and scientific specialist areas, Swiss publications are cited, on average, more frequently than other global publications are. These factors have enabled Swiss companies to retain their competitive edge despite the strength of the Swiss franc in recent years. 

In a Europe-wide comparison, the EU’s Innovation Union Scoreboard 2014 identified Switzerland as a first-class location for innovation. Switzerland was rated first in terms of innovative strength, followed by Sweden, Denmark, and Germany. The rating is based on the number of PhD students and scientific publications per capita. In addition, on the innovation scale, which consists of 25 factors, Switzerland scored higher than 0.8 – well above the EU average of around 0.68.

To further strengthen Switzerland’s innovation capacity, the government is planning on establishing Switzerland Innovation, an innovation park with various hubs and network locations for the promotion of research and innovation. The first centers are due to open in early 2016.

Download the Innovation fact sheet

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Fact Sheet
December 05, 2016
Moscow, Russia